Saturday, 5 July 2014

A Top of Many Frills

As my blog followers will no doubt know, I love a frill or two (or more), but this garment wasn't necessarily on my list of makes post May as I'd planned to construct more comfy cozy stuff.

A frilling tube ride
So, what happened?  I was hit by a bolt of inspiration on our last day in Barcelona when a hotel guest where we were staying showed her chicness in a frill top and cropped pants.  A shopping trip to my local fabric store saw me purchasing this cerise, pink and grey sale fabric at £5.99 per metre, as I was sure I could knock something up from a metre of this not so easy to work with georgette at some time in the future.

In the meantime, however, a friends birthday saw me on my usual last minute hunt for presents and finding a pattern in Patrones number 269, pattern number 3 by Oxy Coky I dug out some leftover fabric from my Flower Dress and set to work on a handmade present.  Not knowing the gift receiver's size I did a bit of guesswork and the pattern very helpfully allowed for an element of under and over sizing. I added a stretch back to give more variation and it came together well. 


So, back to the frills. Loving the gift I'd made, I decided this pattern would be ideal for the georgette fabric as I could modify to my heart's content on making a garment that fitted my frame.

I cut out the basic pattern and then simply added four frills which I measured out at 1.5 long x the width of the top x 12 cm depth (the frills are on the front only).

Someone wasn't impressed with cutting out!
I started off by stay stitching each frill hem 0.5 cm from the edge to stabilise the georgette which made it easier to handle the hem and also didn't require me to press first which is a complete mare with georgette. Once the first layer of hem was stitched it also made it easy to turn over the fabric into a double hem.  I then removed the stay stitches.



After hemming and gathering the bottom three frills were attached to the bodice starting with about an inch under the armhole to leave space for binding the armhole edge.  These were then sewn into the side seam. The top frill was placed 10cm above the frill sewn into the side seam and I hemmed the side of this frill so it hung free as opposed to being encased as this would have spoiled the hang of the frill, the armhole being curved.


As the pattern of the neckline was slightly wide I adapted it with three small darts to give it a good fit.

Once the frills were attached I finished them off with some matching ribbon along the edge of each frill, which required some careful trimming of the seam attachments and then bias binded the neck and armhole edges.



Here it is getting it's first outing with my Right Trousers.  I just love those frills - they give the top great movement and feel very feminine.  This is a garment that can be dressed up or down so it's going to be a much worn and useful addition to my hand made wardrobe.

Ease factor:  6 out of 10 the basic top is fairly easy - any basic vest shape can be used.  Frills require a little patience but worthwhile persevering.  Georgette also a little fiddly to work with but staystitching helps enormously.

Cost:  1 metre of georgette - £5.99, ribbon 80p, binding £1.10 so, about £8.00

Go on - frill yourself.

Happy sewing

Linda x

9 comments:

  1. Love this! Also love those trousers... one day I will get up the courage to make pants! :) I nominated you for the versatile blogger award; just posted details: http://kylachristine.wordpress.com/2014/07/06/the-versatile-blogger-award/

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    1. Thank you. The pants are not so daunting and you could always try a back or side zip to start off if you don't want to try the fiddly front fastening. Thank you also for your nomination. Will check out your blog.

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  2. This is a lovely top! The entire outfit came together quite nicely!

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    1. Thank you, I was really pleased with the top.

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  3. This outfit is fabulous!! (and what a lucky recipient of such a cute top too) - One of my fave RTW tops is frilled & has been in my wardrobe for more than a decade - I thick you've just inspired me to recreate a version of it!

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment. It really spurs me on in my makes to know that other people think my "home mades" look good. Well, I definitely think you should create a version for you, the fiddly frills are worth it and have great movement if you pick the right fabric. I look forward to seeing your version.

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  4. I love it, well done you - again. Love the dog by the way LOL!!!!

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  5. What a difference those frill make. The finished top is so stylish. I've thought of adding a fill before but was worried i'd muck it up. These look lovely.

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    1. HI Louise
      I hope I've inspired you to have a go at playing with some frills - they're really not difficult. You could always try maybe one frill to start off with at the hem. Good luck

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